About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 29
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know, literally shook me out of bed. i kind of gathered myself and looked out the window and i saw this giant streak across the sky that was th
the mission. many filed alongside malian forces to regain control of northern cities. a government spokesperson said a withdraw would depend on traini malian troops. e frch and the alls continued to run into some insurgents outside major cities. they got into a fire fight on tuesday. they fear they could creep back into cities they wouldn't held. riots have broken out in tunisia after an official was shot dead. a leading member of the secular popular front party. he suffer is multiple gunshot wounds in the head and chest. the after the arab spring uprising in 2011. he said the culprit will be arrested. the murder sparked protests in tunis and around the country. tunisia has been gripped by instability and economic hardship. party leaders came to power making promises but they see problems before the arab spring. >>> executives seem happier with the recent economic climate. tell us what's changed. >> we've had a new government in japan and stock prices went higher. all of this seems to be working in the favor of boosting confidence for japan's manufacturing. orders for manufacture c
near the northern city of aleppo. they say they've captured fighter jets and a large number of weapons. they say some of the planes appear to be in working order. rebels seized syria's largest dam on monday. they've been launching attacks on aleppo's international airport. government troops have responded with air strikes on aleppo and the capital damascus. opposition activists say more than 50 people died in the latest fighting. >>> a man has attacked people in the u.s. pacific territory of guam with a knife. local police say he killed two people and he wounded at least 12 other people, 11 of them japanese. the man reportedly slammed his car into a shop in the busy tourist district of tumon. then he started attacking people. hospital officials say the two dead were japanese women. they say the wounded include an 8-month-old baby and a 3-year-old child. fire officials say three people died. police say they've detained a 21-year-old american resident of guam. >>> japanese exporters and stock investors have seen the decline of the yen and have cheered it on, but today they're seeing a di
involving the members of the clergy to an investigation into money laundering in vatican city. a court convicted his former butler last year of stealing and leaking classified documents that pointed to corruption in the vatican. the pope pardoned him over christmas. it's rare for a pope to resign. pope benedict is the first to quit in nearly 600 years. senior members of the catholic church will now start planning their conclave, the meeting they hold to choose a successor. >>> police in the united states are investigating yet another case of gun violence. pop ben fikt benedict xvi will be one of the most religious thinkers of the age. >> the president says he has warm memories. the meeting drew attention because of the different views on abortion rights. he hopes it will be a legacy to build further dialogue and tolerance. >>> we were briefedy our japanese allies on the incident. we've satisfied ourselves that it does appear to have happened. >> japanese officials say the radar was locked eed on a marit destroyer. they argued the vessel used navigational radar and not fire controlled r
at gun shows. that dpebt is now spreading well beyond washington as cities and states take steps to distance themselves from gun manufacturers. in new york last week, the city school teachers pension fund sold off $13.5 million it held in stock with five gun makers. that followed action in california where the state teachers retirement system also stripped itself of $11.7 million of investments from three gun manufacturers. and the golden state's $254 billion public employees retirement system is also deciding whether to withdraw the $5 million worth of shares it holds in two companies. in chicago, mayor rahm emmanuel focused on banks, asking t.d. bank and bank of america to stop financing gun manufacturers. chicago's gun violence has placed it in the center of the national debate. michelle obama attended the funeral of hadiya pendleton who was shot to death near her school days after marching in the presidential inaugural parade and pendleton's parents joined mrs. obama as her guest at the state of the union speech last week. president obama returned to his hometown last week to
cities have been dealing with smog for weeks. emissions from cars and factories contain something called fine particulate matter. it can cause asthma, bronchitis, and other health problems. environment ministry officials in tokyo consulted experts. then they decided they would issue warnings to residents when forecasters believe fine particulate matter could reach 70 micrograms per cubic meter of air. that's double the existing standard. officials say at that point they'll tell people to stay indoors and shut their windows. they say children, the elderly, and those with asthma should be especially cautious at any time. these people may be affected by even low levels of pollution. >>> japanese nationals in india are also worried about worsening air pollution there. officials at japan's embassy in new delhi have advised them to stay indoors on days when there are high levels of smog. the embassy issues the notication on wednesday. it says an indian government survey on airborne particulate matter detected an annualized average of 89 micrograms per cubic meter. that's nine times the limit s
the city of kidal. jean-yves le drian said they killed hundreds of insurgents. malian forces have detained several rebel leaders. le drian said the operation will continue until the malian government controls all of its territory. then he said the french would hand over the mission to units from african countries. french foreign minister laurent fabeu said he would consider withdrawi withdrawing personnel next month if the operation goes smoothly. >>the leader of syr's opposition coalition has offered to hold talks. the head of the syrian national coalition made the offer in appearances on two television networks. >> translator: we will hold talks if the government accepts a political solution. >> khatib described the humanitarian situation as dire. he said that left the opposition with no option but to negotiate with assad. he proposed negotiations with assad's deputy, vice president farouk al sharaa. >>> people in gece aren't ppy ove how their lives have changed under a government austerity program. but government officials suggest they may have turned a corner. ai uchida joins us from t
of southeast asia keeps growing, more people are flying from city to city in the region. atr is training pilots right in asia. the french-italian company hopes it will urge companies to buy its turbo prop planes. a japanese airline that shuttles between regionalities has cided to start using tee of the propeller planes. >> at the beginning of the operation in japan with atr, we are confident that we can be successful. >> higher fuel prices are propelling changes to regional air travel. nhk world, paris. >>> people in norlt north western japan are used to dealing with wintry conditions. this time they're finding themselves under. >> the snowfall has reached record breaking levels. it's already at 502 centimeters which is the record so far this timef year. this is accompanied with gusts of 90 kilometers were hour. both combined are bringing blizzard conditions. the bad news is that the accumulation is going to be some staggering amount in the next 24 hours due to the additional snowfall of another 60 centimeters. another 60 centimeters will likely to bring more record breaking amounts. the winds
flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also be historic. weather forecasters predict it will leave up to three feet of snow in a wide swath stretching from new york to boston. preparations are well underway. airlines cancelled nearly 4,500 flights, leaving many travelers stranded. >> here at laguardia, as you can see, our port authority men and women are hard at work preparing for the storm. our fleet of snow removal vehicles and sand and agent spreaders are prepped and ready for action. >> reporter: amtrak has also canceled many trips in the northeast. the storm is expected to deliver a harsh blow to areas of the east coast still recovering from superstorm sandy. >> hurricane sandy cost the economy a $100 billion and the recovery efforts are still
, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how his arrest has focused attention on the unusually high rate of violence against women in south africa. >> domestic violence is shot through the entire society from the highest of the highed in socioeconomic terms to the lowest of the low. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100
in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i spoke to him on tuesday if he 90-- 29nd street y here in new york and here is part of that conversation. >> i should take note of the fact that this book is dedicated to his mother, pauline gore o ddt age 92 in 2004, his father died when he was 90. this is good genes, i'm telling you here. and in the dedication he said she gave me a future and a an abiding curiosity about what it holds and a sense of our commune human ablegation to help shape it. so this book is about the question of what are the drivers that are chan
their windows to a haze of pollution and residents of other cities are seeing the same things. officials say nearly half the population has been affected by serious air pollution. the official said smog containing fine particulate matter has blanketed a quarter of the land. the air and about 70% of chinese cities doesn't meet environmental standards. each year 15 million more cars take to the road. government officials want to reduce the density of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. a think tank says air pollution exceeded national standards for 27 days in january. people across china have their own opinions on what needs to be done. academics and residents shared some ide i beijing. the group friends of nature hosted the debate. one par tticipant called for tighter control. another said the government should crackdown on companies that ignore environmental laws. they plan to submit proposals next month. >> translator: we want to the government to be transparent. >> the pollution has turned out company in beijing.y for one the firm is selling cans of fresh air for about 75 cents a pi
. >>> visitors to the city office near tokyo are enjoying a display of elegance in miniature form. represent members of the nobility and the customes they wore. citizen groups are showing off an extensive collection. the dolls are the centerpiece of a festival every march. families set them out as a way to pray for good health for their daughters. craftsman have been making the dolls for nearly 400 years. residents collected more than 1,800 dolls from all over the country. they're displaying them to draw attention and visitors. the dolls at the top are seven meters off the floor. >> translator: they reach right up to the ceiling. they're amazing. >> translator: it's wonderful to see something big like this. >> the dolls will be on display until march 9th. >>> people who travel a long way to see natural beauty. mountains, water falls, sunsets. but what about fog? residents of one misty town claim their unusual climate is worth the trip. >> reporter: a chilly winter morning. dawn breaks. a dense fog forms in the mountains sweeps down the river valley. and out to sea. locals call this a storm.
, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why the super bowl blackout means it's time for the cities that host professional sports teams to focus on the basics. >> tom: stocks were back in the green after suffering their biggest sell-off in months yesterday. one encouraging sign came from the service sector. the non-manufacturing index slipped in january from december, but not as much as feared, according to the institute of supply management. the employment index was at its highest level in almost seven years. the dow gained 100, the nasdaq increased 40, the s&p was up almost 16. >> susie: the u.s. government made it official today. it filed a suit against standard and poors' credit agency for giving optimistic ratings on troubled securities that later failed and contributed to the financial crisis. the justice department could seek as much as $5 billion from s&p. it claims that's the amount of money federally insured financial institutions lost because of s&p's alleged wrongdoing. the government claims s&p ratings services knowingly executed a "scheme to defraud investors." >> duri
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: madeleine albright is here. she was secretary of sta fro 1997 to001. her approach to american foreign policy was marked by a muscular commitment to the ideal of democracy. her story began in far away lands, she was born in czechoslovakia before the start of world war ii. she looks back at her childhood in her latest book called "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war." the paper back version is just out. i am pleased to have her on this program. welcome. >> wonderful to visit you. thank you. >> rose: you told me about this wonderful organization that you have started which is called -- which is all about the former foreign ministers around the world. >> it's sponsored by aspin, it's the aspin foreign ministers forum we its unofficial name is madeleine and her exes. >> rose: (laughs) >> and we meet a couple times a year talk and share a lot of experience. i have a business, i have a global consulting firm and i teach at georgetown and i'm chairman of the board of the national democratic institute which is something that was started i
. besides mardi gras, it's also still riding high from hosting the super bowl. the city's tourism officials say one million people are in town for the festivities. now, that's more than five times as many people who showed up for the super bowl. new orleans' economy took a big hit when hurricane katrina struck in 2005, but these big turnouts are helping its economic comeback. >> tourism is our most important industry. it's a $5 billion industry for new orleans. it employs 75,000 of our local citizens, so it is absolutely critical that we continue to do events like mardi gras, super bowls, final fours, big conventions, business meetings. that is the lifeblood of the city. >> susie: she also says this year's mardi gras is expected to bring in almost $150 million and that the planning never stops. tomorrow, new orleans will start working on mardi gras 2014. well, that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, february 12. have a great evening, everyone. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.w
have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset. those are close. the syrians fire at the jordanians every night but the jordanians don't fire back. and bashar's forces shoot and shell the groups of refugees hiding somewhere down there in the darkness. unexpectedly, a jordanian ambulance arrives
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with a look at the crises in syria. nearly 70,000 people have died in one of the most deadly civil wars in recent history. two years in and the community has debated how to intervene. the united states hasiven nearly $400 million in humanitarian aid. he's remained fragmented and disorganized. as the violence skates the united states has increasing efforts to arm the groups. joining me is michael gordon the chief military correspondent for the "new york times." i'm please to do have him on this program. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> much to talk about. let me begin with syria. we all know from congressional testimony from leon panetta the former sect of defense and others that there was a recommendation from leon panetta and from david petraeus at ci and from hillary clinton at state to do something. >> so what happened, i believe, and i did a lot of reporting on it. and actually it was an article that i worked on with mark rangler that was the basis
, tokyo. >>> vietnamese who live in rural areas are starting to see the effects of the city on their daily lives. urban pollution is spreading to the countryside, and it's affecting their health. but some japanese businesspeople have stepped in to help. nhk world has more from hanoi. >> reporter: vietnam's economy is racing ahead. but not everybody is moving forward. hanoi is crowded with motorbikes. across the country, people work with circumstances in the environment. this river running through tepco is dangerous. the environment readings are four times higher than recommended by the government. people living downstream are suffering the consequences. juan and his wife were born and raised in this village. they are farmers who survive by growing rice and other crops. the day is spent walking in the rice paddies. >> translator: the watery fill my paddies with is black. my legs itch from working in the rice fields. water shouldn't be black, but i have no choice but to use that terrible water for farming. >> reporter: there are many such worries about pollution. a new deal originating in ja
to making different kinds of product. sabae, a city in western japan, makes 95% of japan's eyewear. but sales have dropped 30% since their peak in the '90s. that's because customers have been buying more eyewear produc from chinese coanies. their prices are lower. >> translator: in a few years, sabae could become the hub for making medical equipment. i hope that our products will help many doctors around the world. >> reporter: already the firm is gearing up to make those sales. and if competitors get on the bandwagon, a straggling industry may get a fresh start. nhk world, sabae. >>> the japanese government has been struggling to designate final disposal sites for radioactive waste generated by the fukushima radioactive accident. they oppose the idea of contaminated materials on their territory. now government officials said they'll rethink the way they select the storage sites. the environment ministry plans to ask each prefecture to dispose of contaminated mud and ash from incinerators on its territory. it's hoping to build new disposal sites in five prefectures. they have desig
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we ve spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higr education. the simple fact that the more education you'v
, maybe two. peak travel to key cities could be snarled by late march. smaller airports may have to shut down altogether. you can find the list on the department of transportation's website. the administration denies these announcements are part of a campaign to pressure house republicans to change course and head off the cuts. >> the idea that we are doing this to create some kind of horrific scare tactic is nonsense. we are required to cut a billion dollars. and if more than half of our employees are at the f.a.a., the f.a.a.-- there has to be some impact. >> reporter: and the f.a.a. cuts don't include potential delays from cutbacks as t.s.a. furloughs employees. the defense department has already informed 800,000 workers they may be furloughed and face a 20% paycut as it struggles to find a way to cut $46 billion from its budget. adding it all up, the president warns the picture is not pretty. >> the overall impact to the recovery will be to slow down the recovery. and not only may there end up being direct job loss, but, because the economy is softer, it also means that we're not goi
was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: tom donilon is here, he is the president's national security advisor. part of his job is to prepare and deliver the presidential daily brief on national security. joe biden has called him the most important person in the mix this week in the vice president spoke about foreign policy challenges at the munish security conference. >> we have made it clear at the outset that we would not-- we would be prepared to me bilaterally with the irani leadership. we would not make it a secret that we were doing that. we would let our partners know if that occasion presented itself. that offer stands. nearly all of our partners and allies are convinced that president assad is a tyrant, hell-bent on clinging to power, is no longer fit to lead the syrian people and he must go. >> as well as syria and iran the united states faces new challenges from islammix extremism in african, yet it is not clear they are ready to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are sch
are going out of this airplane? >> through the city of antwerp, which is the main diamond cartier in belgium, we have eight in every ten uncut diamond and five in every ten uncut diamonds. it's worth billions. >> sreenivasan: thanks so much. >> thanks for having me. >> sreenivasan: the civilian death toll in afghanistan has dropped for the first time in six years. a new report today from the united nations said more than 2,700 civilians died last year. that was down from more than 3,100 the previous year. still, violence claimed the lives of more women and girls, up 20% from 2011. the new data came a day after president hamid karzai banned afghan troops from calling in air strikes in residential areas. the former top u.s. commander in afghanistan is going to retire, instead of becoming the overall nato commander in europe. president obama announced today that marine general john allen will end his military career. allen's nomination for the nato post was put on hold last fall, amid questions about e-mail exchanges with a woman in florida. the general was cleared of all wrongdoing, but he sai
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)